Wrapping up Lent & the meaning of today

I’m writing this sitting at a bar in a diner. Next to me there is an older lady, drinking her coffee alone.  She’s looking around, smiling gently at others, not desperate for conversation, but not avoiding it.  She has nothing in her hands except her mug.

I, on the other hand, have a coffee, my phone, my kindle and my laptop all at my fingertips.  All available. All ready to ease me out of any discomfort that might come from being here alone on Easter Sunday.  What is it about us that is so uncomfortable at the thought of sitting, alone without distraction in a public setting.  Fear of boredom?  I think not.  I think it’s fear of being uncomfortable, fear of embarrassment; shame.

Lent 34-35: when not belonging feels good

 

I’m writing this in a coffee shop in London between appointments with old friends and new work partners.

What a strange thing it is: life.  What strange stories people tell themselves about it.  What strange explanations we have for pain or for fear or for success or for joy.  Always telling ourselves and one another stories, always trying to make sense of our experiences drawing on all the possible explanations we have been handed in our lives and finding the one that fits best.

Lent 26-29: faith full

Well, good day my friends.

You know what I’m thinking about today?  Faithfulness.  Being filled with faith.  And how strange it is that we reduce that word to law keeping.  Like – Joe is faithful.  Meaning, Joe does what he says he’s going to and  he doesn’t mess up.  We can trust him to do what he says, because he’s faith-full.

What if being trustworthy is a fruit of faithfulness, but not faithfulness itself?

Lent 2: love?

I read a psychology article the other day discussion the components that psychologists have identified that make up this thing we call love. There are three:

  1. ‘Intimacy’ – this is the knowing-ness part of love: how much you feel comfortable, safe and known by the other person.  It increases with time and depth and familiarity: the more you can predict what the other person will do.
  2. ‘Passion’ – this is the intensity part, the draw, the attraction.  It is higher the more unpredictable something is (since dopamine is released in your brain MOST when things are unpredictable).

The end of a story

Her brain fell into the habitual and familiar pattern of scanning, seeking, searching through the vault in her mind for possible solution. But all it came up with was an unfamiliar emptiness. When everything fails what is left to do? Some action must be taken, even if it is the action of failure.

With a brisk quick brush of her hands, before she could reconsider, she dropped the last of the gunpowder residue to the ground and let it take with it her last plan, their last option for salvation.