Some thoughts for Harvey helpers

Twelve years ago, I stood in the Astrodome for the first time and began a long weekend of attempting to care.

I wrote and published my first article after that weekend.  I’m a little embarrassed by the words I wrote then, but I still remember what I felt when I typed those words.  I remember how it felt to walk in, adrenalin pumping, ready and eager to help, so desperate to do something and so sure I could.

I learned a few things that weekend, but I learned a lot more in the years after.

Weary and restless and ready

Sometimes, when I can’t pray, I write.  It’s a step that sometimes helps me find the thing that is stuck in my heart, the thorn that is keeping me from Him.  Sometimes it’s sin, sometimes it’s just confusion, sometimes it’s pain.

What I know today is that there is this restlessness inside my soul, that is shifting around more and more each day, making me too uncomfortable to ignore for much longer. Sometimes it feels like an ache, sometimes like rage, mostly like desperation.

Culture and Adoption project

I’m thrilled to share with you guys a little something I’ve been working on!  Read about the Culture and Adoption project below, and share with your pals 🙂 

Together for Adoption is thrilled to be launching the Culture and Adoption Project (CAP), offering free resources, training, as well as 4 free coaching/counseling sessions for families who want help navigating cultural obstacles in Foster Care & Adoption!

Culture is an integral part of our identity formation, impacting the way we relate to ourselves, others and the world around us.  Fostered or adopted children are required to cross cultures – even if it’s just moving across the street!  They face tremendous opportunities and they also face tremendous challenges like identity confusion, acculturative stress, or cultural bereavement. 

Lent 21: are you getting the support you need?

I’m learning a lot about social support right now and how much it impacts your life.  (Warning: as I prep for finals, I’m guessing a lot of these lent blogs are going to be related to what I’m learning).

It’s made me think a lot about the various support I receive/perceive from friends, church and God, so I thought I’d share.

Psychologists tend to think of social support as offering four different things:

  1. Instrumental support (providing the necessities of life): these are the people who organize the meal train and offer to babysit.

The gift of lost luxury

I don’t know what to share on this blog these days.

I  don’t have a ton of time right now. Two jobs.  A pilot study.  An internship. Full time school.  Writing is just having to take a back seat for a season. I’ve assumed, that’s why these pages have stayed relatively empty, but, if I’m honest – there’s another problem: I don’t know what to say anymore.

There is a luxury I have lost. It is the luxury of sharing opinions publicly that never threaten your closest community because they all agree with you.